Center Faculty

Courtney L. Anderson
LL.M., Georgetown University
J.D., Harvard Law School
B.S., University of Pittsburgh

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Courtney L. Anderson

Courtney Anderson joined the College of Law in 2012. Her legal experience has been focused in the area of transactional law and community and economic development. Her position supports GSU’s Second Century Initiative, which focuses on interdisciplinary research into how law and policy might impact the social, economic, and environmental determinants of health, particularly among minority, low-income, and vulnerable populations.

Prior to joining the College of Law, Professor Anderson was a clinical fellow at Georgetown University Law Center’s Harrison Institute for Affordable Housing and Community Development where she represented low-income tenant associations in purchasing and rehabilitating multifamily housing units. She also practiced in the real estate group at Sidley Austin LLP.

Professor Anderson teaches Law and Social Welfare and Property courses.

Roberta Berry

 

 

 

 

 

 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame
J.D., University of Wisconsin
B.A., Swarthmore College

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Roberta Marie Berry

Roberta M. Berry has a joint faculty appointment at Georgia State University College of Law as professor of science and technology law, policy & ethics. Berry is a tenured associate professor at Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Public Policy. She has been a faculty fellow with the center since 2007. She is a former practicing attorney in health law and a former law professor in health law, bioethics, medical malpractice, insurance law, and contracts. Dr. Berry’s research and teaching focus on bioethics, health law and policy, and the legal, ethical, and policy implications of bioscience and biotechnology research and innovation.

Lisa R. Bliss
J.D., University of Florida
B.A., University of North Florida

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Lisa R. Bliss

Lisa Bliss is director of experiential education and associate clinical professor at Georgia State University’s College of Law and Co-Director of the in-house Health Law Partnership (HeLP) Legal Services Clinic.

Professor Bliss serves as a member of the Best Practices Implementation Committee of the Clinical Legal Education Association and as Associate Editor of Litigation News, published by the ABA Section of Litigation. Her professional experience includes private practice as a litigator, public interest service as Deputy Director of the Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation, and clinical teaching. Her teaching interests include creating interdisciplinary learning experiences for law students together with law students in the health professions and incorporating experiential learning in both clinical and nonclinical courses.

Professor Bliss teaches courses on public interest law and social welfare, pretrial litigation and HeLP Clinic I and II.

Erin C. Fuse Brown
J.D., Georgetown University
M.P.H., Johns Hopkins
School of Public Health
B.A., Dartmouth College

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Erin C. Fuse Brown

Erin C. Fuse Brown joined the faculty of Georgia State University’s College of Law in 2012. Professor Fuse Brown came to the College of Law from Arizona State University’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, where she was a Visiting Assistant Professor and Visiting Fellow in Ethics and Health Policy with the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics. Previously, she practiced in the health care group of the San Francisco office of Ropes & Gray LLP.

Professor Fuse Brown teaches Administrative Law and Health Law: Financing and Delivery courses.

Sylvia B. Caley
J.D., Georgia State University
M.B.A., Georgia State University
B.A., Oglethorpe University
R.N., Royal Victoria Hospital School of Nursing

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Sylvia B. Caley

Sylvia Caley is Associate Clinical Professor at Georgia State University’s College of Law. She also serves as Director of the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) and Co-Director of the in-house HeLP Legal Services Clinic.

Professor Caley has extensive experience in health care, health law and policy, and poverty law, and her work-related interests have centered on the intersection of health and poverty. Of particular interest to her is the devastating effect that serious illness has on families, and how solving legal problems can help to improve the health and social well-being of low-income children. Professor Caley is a member of the Grady Health System Ethics Committee and the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Bioethics Committee.

Professor Caley teaches courses on health policy and legislation and HeLP Clinic I and II. She also lectures extensively on legal issues affecting child health and well-being.

Yaniv Heled
J.S.D., Columbia Law School
LL.M., Columbia Law School
LL.B., Tel Aviv University
Undergraduate Program
in Biology, Tel Aviv
University

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Yaniv Heled

Yaniv Heled is Assistant Professor at Georgia State University’s College of Law, joining the College of Law in 2011. He has published several articles on issues at the intersection of law and biomedical technology.

Professor Heled’s research focuses on patent policy in the area of pharmaceuticals and on regulation of biomedical technologies such as biologics, donated reproductive tissue and stem cells.

Prior to joining the College of Law, Professor Heled practiced intellectual property law at Goodwin Procter LLP in New York. He has also previously taught at Tel Aviv University and other law schools abroad.

Professor Heled teaches courses on patent law, intellectual property, and law and emerging technologies.

Paul A. Lombardo
Ph.D., University of Virginia
J.D., University of Virginia
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago
A.B., Rockhurst College

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Paul A. Lombardo

Paul Lombardo is Bobby Lee Cook Professor of Law at Georgia State University’s College of Law. He has published extensively on health law, medico-legal history, and bioethics. Professor Lombardo’s award-winning 2008 book, Three Generations, No Imbeciles: Eugenics, the Supreme Court and Buck v. Bell, was reissued in paperback in 2010. His latest book, A Century of Eugenics: From the Indiana Experiment to the Human Genome Era was published in December, 2010.

He served as an ad hoc member of the National Institutes of Health Study Section on the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Genetic Research as well as the National Library of Medicine Committee for Peer Review of scholarly manuscripts. His interests include the ethical conduct of international research projects, particularly those involving epidemiological assessment of environmental and workplace exposure to toxic substances.

Professor Lombardo teaches courses on genetics and the law, great cases in bioethics and the law, and law and psychiatry.

 8-17-15-TimLyttonheadshot
J.D., Yale University
B.A., Yale University

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Timothy D. Lytton

Timothy D. Lytton’s research examines health and safety regulations, with a particular focus on food policy. His most recent book, Kosher: Private Regulation in the Age of Industrial Food (Harvard University Press 2013), examines kosher food certification as a model of private regulation in the food industry, and the book explores the implications of this model for food safety and food labeling.

He is writing a book, Outbreak: Foodborne Illness and the Evolving Food Safety System (under contract with The University of Chicago Press) about the complex interaction of government regulation, industry supply-chain management, and tort liability in the U.S. food safety system. His research also explores food policy in the areas of obesity, nutrition labeling, and school food. He recently conducted research in collaboration with the New York State Department of Health to assess the effectiveness of New York State laws and regulations aimed at promoting breastfeeding as part of the state’s infant nutrition and obesity prevention policies. The research was funded by a multi-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Public Health Law Research Program.

Lytton has a longstanding interest in the public policy implications of tort litigation. He has explored this subject through case studies of contemporary issues such as clergy sexual abuse and gun violence. His book Holding Bishops Accountable: How Lawsuits Helped the Catholic Church Confront Clergy Sexual Abuse (Harvard University Press 2008) explores how private lawsuits shape public policy. An earlier edited volume, Suing the Gun Industry: A Battle at the Crossroads of Gun Control and Mass Torts (University of Michigan Press 2005), analyzes tort litigation aimed at reducing gun violence.

Lytton has published several articles and book chapters on rabbinic law and jurisprudence, and is co-author of Jurisprudence, Cases and Materials: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Law and Its Applications (Lexis Publishing 3d ed. 2015).

His work has appeared in the Texas, Virginia, Cornell, Northwestern, and Wisconsin law reviews; the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, the American Journal of Law & Medicine, and Public Health Nutrition; popular magazines such as The American Interest, Regulation, and the Jewish Review of Books; and blogs including the Huffington Post and RegBlog.

He teaches Administrative Law, Torts, Products Liability, and Legislation & Statutory Interpretation.

Lytton joined Georgia State University College of Law in 2015. He taught previously for 15 years at Albany Law School, where he was the Albert & Angela Farone Distinguished Professor of Law. He has been a fellow in the Harvard Program on Ethics and the Professions as well as the Hartman Institute for Advanced Jewish Studies in Jerusalem. He has done conflict resolution work in Central America and the Middle East.

Charity Scott
M.S.C.M., Kennesaw State University
J.D., Harvard University
A.B., Stanford University

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Charity Scott

Charity Scott is Catherine C. Henson Professor of Law with a joint appointment in Georgia State University’s College of Law and J. Mack Robinson College of Business, Institute of Health Administration.

Professor Scott is a member of the American Law Institute. In 2006 she received the Jay Healey Distinguished Health Law Teacher Award, presented by the American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics. She is past Chair of the Health Law Section of the State Bar of Georgia, and is active in leadership positions with the ABA’s Health Law Section. She has published on a variety of health law issues, including antitrust and the health care field, medical ethics and the law, medical privacy, and health policy.

Professor Scott teaches courses on health care law and policy, bioethics, tort law, and negotiation.

 

Emily Suski

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LL.M., Georgetown University
J.D., University of North Carolina
M.S.W., University of North Carolina
B.A., University of North Carolina

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Emily F. Suski

Emily Suski is a Clinical Supervising Attorney in the in-house Health Law Partnership (HeLP) Legal Services Clinic at Georgia State University’s College of Law. Prior to joining the HeLP Clinic, she co-taught the Child Advocacy Clinic at the University of Virginia School of Law, and she was a Clinical Teaching Fellow at Georgetown University Law Center. She also worked at the Legal Aid Justice Center in Charlottesville, Virginia. Professor Suski has extensive experience advocating for children and adolescents with disabilities and has trained hundreds of medical professionals, lawyers, and others on education and disability law. Her professional and teaching interests include how health, disabilities, and poverty affect students in the public education system, as well as the ways interdisciplinary collaboration can improve outcomes for youth with health problems and disabilities.

Professor Suski co-teaches the HeLP Clinic I and II courses.

Jonathan Todres
J.D., Columbia Law School
B.A., Clark University

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Jonathan Todres

Jonathan Todres is Associate Professor of Law at Georgia State University’s College of Law. He has published articles on a range of children’s rights issues and health law issues.

Professor Todres’ research focuses primarily on issues of violence against children, including trafficking and sexual exploitation of children. He serves as a regular advisor to non-governmental organizations working to combat child exploitation.

Professor Todres is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. He is active in leadership positions in the ABA Section of International Law and served previously as Chair of the Section’s International Health Law Committee and as Vice-Chair of its International Human Rights Committee. He previously taught at New York University School of Law and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law of Yeshiva University. Prior to his legal career, he worked for a number of years in international health.

Professor Todres teaches courses on human rights and children, public health law, international and comparative health law, and torts.

Professor Leslie Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

M.P.H., Johns Hopkins
School of Public Health
J.D., Harvard Law School
A.B., Stanford University

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Leslie E. Wolf

Leslie E. Wolf is Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Law, Health & Society at Georgia State University’s College of Law. She conducts research in a variety of areas in health and public health law and ethics, with a particular focus on research ethics. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Cancer Institute, the National Human Genome Research Institute, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Greenwall Foundation. This work includes empirical research on conflicts of interest, research with stored biological materials, Certificates of Confidentiality, IRB web guidance, and HIV-related laws and policies.

Prior to joining the law school, Professor Wolf taught medical ethics and research ethics at the University of California, San Francisco, where she also served on the UCSF institutional review board and advisory committee regarding stem cell research. She also previously was selected as a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics and Health Policy and as a Greenwall Faculty Scholar.

Since joining GSU, she has served on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Ethics Subcommittee to the Advisory Committee to the Director (2008-2012), as a peer reviewer for the Department of Defense, and has been an invited presenter to various government agencies.

Professor Wolf has taught courses on medical liability, human subjects research, public health law, HIV/AIDS and the law, and bioethics.

 8-5-15-Patti-Zettler
J.D., Stanford University
B.A., Stanford University

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Patricia J. Zettler

Patricia J. Zettler, associate professor of law, has expertise in the regulation of medicine, biotechnology and biomedical research, with an emphasis on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  Her research focuses on the interaction between state and federal regulation of medicine and science, the challenges that innovation poses for the FDA’s regulatory scheme, and the treatment use of experimental drugs and devices outside of clinical trials. Zettler’s scholarship has appeared or is forthcoming in various legal and medical journals, including the San Diego Law Review, Yale Journal of Health Policy Law and Ethics, Boston University International Law Journal, JAMA Internal Medicine, EMBO Molecular Medicine, and Academic Medicine. She also teaches Torts and Food and Drug Law.

Before joining Georgia State Law in 2015, she was a fellow at the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford Law School. Prior to her fellowship, she served as an associate chief counsel in the FDA’s Office of Chief Counsel. In this role, she advised the FDA and the Department of Health and Human Services on various issues including drug safety, human subjects protection, expanded access to investigational drugs, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements, prescription drug advertising and promotion, incentives for developing antibiotics and advisory committees.

In addition to her legal background, Zettler has several years of experience in bioethics. While in law school, she spent a semester in the National Institutes of Health’s Bioethics department conducting research on expanded access to investigational drugs. Before law school, she worked as a research assistant at the Program in Medical Ethics at the University of California San Francisco, focusing on ethical issues in human embryonic stem cell research and physician-patient communication. At UCSF, she also served as the coordinator of the Greenwall Faculty Scholars Program.

Zettler graduated with distinction from Stanford Law School in 2009. She received a B.A. in psychology, with distinction and departmental honors, from Stanford University in 2002, where she played on the varsity lacrosse team.