Suski: Simply Punishing Students for Bullying Will Not Fix Problem

The spring legislative season is well underway, and, as has been the case for the last several years, a number of states are again considering and passing amendments to their anti-bullying laws.

This year, Florida and Kentucky, for example, saw amendments to their anti-bullying laws introduced in their general assemblies.… more »

If We Don’t Own Our Genes, What Protects Subjects in Genetic Research?

By Leslie E. Wolf and Erin Fuse Brown, Georgia State University, and Laura Beskow, Duke University

On February 25, the White House hosted a forum on the National Institute of Health’s Precision Medicine Initiative. This is an ambitious research study that aims to develop targeted drugs and treatments that would vary… more »

Enhancing Public Health Law and Education

Robert Wood Johnson Program fellows develop interdisciplinary approaches to advancing health through law 

Georgia State Law and its Center for Law, Health & Society led a national program, The Future of Public Health Law Education: Faculty Fellowship Program, to enhance public health law teaching in… more »

Olmstead Disability Rights Clinic Starting Fall Semester

This fall, Georgia State Law will open the Olmstead Disability Rights Clinic in partnership with Atlanta Legal Aid Society’s Disability Integration Project. The yearlong off-site clinic will be taught by the Disability Integration Project’s director, Talley Wells, who will serve as clinic director.

The clinic focuses on advocacy arising… more »

Georgia State Law Ranked 57 in 2017 U.S. News Rankings

ATLANTA — Georgia State University College of Law held steady in U.S. News & World Report rankings at 57 in a three-school tie, out of 196 schools, in the annual graduate rankings released March 16. Georgia State Law was at No. 56 last year.

“We are proud of our standing among U.S. law schools… more »

Caley (M.B.A. ’86, J.D. ’89) Receives Patton Community Service and Social Justice Award

An advocate for children with health care needs in low-income families, Sylvia B. Caley (M.B.A ’86; J.D. ’89), associate clinical professor of law, has left an indelible mark on the community in her quest to eliminate health disparities and promote health equity.

She will be honored on April 25 for her… more »

Hospitals Rationing Drugs Behind Closed Doors: a Civil Rights Issue

The United States is facing a shortage of prescription drugs, ranging from antibiotics to cancer treatments. These shortages are putting the medical profession in the frequent position of deciding who will get the drugs that are in short supply and, more importantly, who will not.

Physicians and hospitals always have had to make rationing decisions… more »

Wolf inducted into Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars

Wolf To Represent Lawyers in Society of Scholars

From doctors to historians, philosophers to engineers, the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars comprises more than 600 of the most influential and pioneering minds in the world. But since its founding in 1969, the society has not included a single lawyer among its illustrious ranks—until now.

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Movies and Myths About Human Trafficking

Hollywood loves a good bad guy.

From ruthless mobsters to drug kingpins to serial killers, evil characters are often plucked from real-world events. As human trafficking has garnered more attention, it was inevitable that the issue would hit the big screen. Traffickers, after all, are your quintessential villains. They enslave and exploit human beings for… more »